Glenna Shaw

I have over 14 years experience creating data visualizations in the form of presentations, project management tools, dashboards, demos, prototypes and system user interfaces. I am a Certified Project Management Professional and an active member of the Presentation Community. I also specialize in creating Microsoft Office files that are fully accessible to persons using assistive technology. In my guise as the PowerPoint Magician, I am the author of the popular PowerPak for PowerPoint series, an innovative collection of lesson and educational game templates. I have been a spotlight speaker at multiple educational events and frequently teach advanced PowerPoint and Word classes. I am Microsoft Certified in PowerPoint and Word, a Microsoft Certified System Engineer and hold Certificates in Accessible Information Technology, Graphics Design and Professional Technical Writing. I am currently working on an Information Designer Certification. I have been a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP since January 2004.

Homepage: http://glennashaw.wordpress.com

Can You See What I ‘m Hearing?

pr12-ep13-justin7

The more I learn about visual perception, the more I believe we don’t see at all, we perceive.

In the picture at left, Project Runway’s Season 12 Designer Justin LeBlanc is helping his model into a beautiful faux fur gown, right? Wrong. The gown is actually made from thousands of test tubes. But our brain translates this particular texture as soft fur because that is what we’ve experienced though both our touch as well as sight. Justin engaged our sense of touch (through familiarity) and fooled our eye.

In truth, while our eyes see, our brain’s perceive with all our senses, not just our eyes. And sometimes that means when other senses come into play, it can drastically change what we think we’re seeing.

For example, by simply adding a small sound you can completely change what your audience perceives. You can download the PowerPoint presentation to see what I mean from here: http://sdrv.ms/1eksk6r (and it must be downloaded since Web Apps will not support a looping slideshow). It has only one slide. This particular example was inspired by an episode of Brain Games, which I mentioned in a previous post. If you watch the slide with your sound muted, the two balls will appear to cross over each other. But if you watch it with sound on, the balls will appear to bounce off one another. Try watching it with sound and without sound and you’ll see how dramatic the difference is. Just by adding elements that engage our other senses, you can change (and enhance) what your audience sees.

Ironically, the designer Justin LeBlanc is deaf and this particular dress represents his adjustment to having a cochlear implant. I’d say he did an amazing job with that inspiration. And taught us all a little lesson in perception.

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Using PowerPoint to Improve Lives

We Are Equal to the Task

Today is the first day of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) and I’m reminded of my roots for the Microsoft PowerPoint MVP award. In the early 2000s the American Disability Act mandated that all electronic communications be made what is called 508 compliant. This means all electronically published items need to work with assistive technology, most notably screen readers. My personal mission was to ensure that users knew how make Office documents and presentations that were accessible. While Microsoft did a fantastic job of making sure persons using assistive technology could use the applications, there was literally no documentation for making sure the end products were compliant. I found myself not only on the bleeding edge, it was more like the hemorrhaging edge with pressure to resolve it every day.

Through the wonderful folks at EASI, I obtained my certificate in Accessible Information Technology and found an incredibly motivated group of testers who helped me identify and document exactly how to make accessible presentations and documents. Since then I’ve taught many classes on how to create accessible documents and presentations and I’m proud to say the Office.com site still carries my articles:

While they were written for PowerPoint 2003, the concepts and techniques are still valid for all versions of PowerPoint.

In 2009, thanks to Ric Bretschneider, I was thrilled to get the opportunity to contribute to a wonderful add-in that allows users to sub-title their presentations. The add-in is available at: Sub-titling text add-in for Microsoft PowerPoint (STAMP) and is a terrific addition to produce presentations for the hearing impaired or for persons who speak a different language. The add-in is for PowerPoint 2010 or higher, but if you’re using an older version of PowerPoint, see my article on Adding captions, annotations, or subtitles to presentations.

In the 10+ years since I first received MVP recognition, I’ve turned most of my attention to areas where my skills truly lie, information design and data visualizations. But I’ve never lost my passion for advocating how PowerPoint can improve the lives of persons with physical challenges. A person who is visually impaired can create their own visual aids with PowerPoint. And that sentence is not an oxymoron. How wonderful that PowerPoint can give that individual just that much more independence.

I’ve also received many testimonials from parents, teachers and others who’ve used PowerPoint to effect a change in someone’s life. For example the mom who used PowerPoint to help her autistic son learn to speak, the teacher who used PowerPoint to help her special needs class learn math and, most profound of all, the father who created a looping PowerPoint of pictures that when you clicked the slide an audio message matching the picture would play.  He put this PowerPoint on a tablet PC attached to his severely disabled daughter’s wheelchair. She would watch the images loop and when one she wanted was displayed, she could tap it and it would play, “I’m hungry”, “I love you, Mom”, etc. Since she could not talk, PowerPoint quite literally gave this young girl a voice. How amazing is that? Is it any wonder I still continue to make myself available to help anyone who wants to use PowerPoint to help improve someone’s life?

Keep in mind most of us are challenged in some way or another even if it isn’t readily apparent. I myself am so vertically challenged I have to kick a stool around my kitchen just to cook dinner or put away dishes. And even if you don’t have challenges now, I assure you, down the road, you will. None of us are exempt from the effects of age. So celebrate NDREAM with me and recognize what people can do.

Do you have your own story to share about how PowerPoint improved your life or someone else’s life? I’d love to hear about it.

Disclaimer:  This site was prepared or accomplished by Glenna Shaw in her personal capacity. The opinions expressed on this site are the author's own and do not reflect the view of the United States government.

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A TV Series for Presenters and Presentation Designers

braingames

You might not believe it, but National Geographic’s Season 2 of Brain Games is a near perfect resource for presenters and presentation designers. While not perfectly scientifically accurate, the series contains a wealth of information about how our brain processes information and it’s delivered in an entertaining format. This is invaluable information if you are a presenter or presentation designer.

The official Brain Games web site has video clips, articles and the schedule for all 12 episodes. Amazon provides the series in both DVD and streaming format. Episodes are also available through NatGeo’s YouTube Channel for $1.99 per episode.

In addition to the series episodes, National Geographic’s Education web site has more resources on how your brain works and, finally, if you’re curious to see how your own brain stacks up, discover your own brain profile at the Interactive Brain Games web site. I highly recommend you watch the episodes first though or you might find you’re not as clever as you thought you were.

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Cloudy with a Chance of Inspiration

Cloud ComputingI love TEDTalks and I especially enjoyed a talk from the TEDGlobal 2013 event in June.  Quoting the site: “You don’t need to plan an exotic trip to find creative inspiration. Just look up, says Gavin Pretor-Pinney, founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society. As he shares charming photos of nature’s finest aerial architecture, Pretor-Pinney calls for us all to take a step off the digital treadmill, lie back and admire the beauty in the sky above.”  I highly encourage you to take a breath and enjoy Gavin’s talk for yourself.

As I was watching the video I was reminded of a presentation that I made for a friend a few years ago.  He was speaking on the topic of Cloud Computing at the Green Computing Conference. Using PowerPoint 2010, I created a presentation where his content tumbled and flew through the sky.  The result was a light and breezy presentation that was unique but professional.

I had the opportunity to show a presentation using this same technique at The Presentation Summit and I noticed admit the ooo’s and ah’s of the audience, it’s a format that makes people smile.

Inspired by Gavin’s talk on clouds, I decided to create and share a Cloudy PowerPoint template.  It’s a deceptively simple template but when used correctly really allows you to Wow! your audience.  The key is the fade background portion of the Dynamic Content Transitions available in PowerPoint 2010 and 2013.  By alternating the cloud background a subtle sense of movement is achieved without conscious awareness by the audience. Like the magician’s redirection trick discussed in a previous blog entry, the “front” portion of the Dynamic Content Transition provides the obvious dynamic movement of the content through the sky.  You can learn more about using PowerPoint’s transitions by viewing my tutorial, The Beauty of Transitions in PowerPoint.

The template is shown below, but alas Web Apps cannot display the Dynamic Content Transitions.  To view (and use) the template, you’ll need to click on the menu icon image (on the navigation bar below), download a copy and run the presentation using the full PowerPoint 2010 or 2013 application.  You can also download directly using this link.  Directions for using the template are included on the slides.

Enjoy the video, enjoy the template and enjoy watching the clouds.

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Kill the Jerk (in PowerPoint Animations)

Many of you may have noticed that animations that run smoothly in PowerPoint 2007 now have a noticeable jerk when played in PowerPoint 2010 and PowerPoint 2013.  The good news is there’s a work-around to the problem.

Both PowerPoint MVPs Troy Chollar and Geetesh Bajaj have published explicit directions on how to apply the work-around to their blogs and, rather than reinvent the wheel, I encourage you to check out their posts:

Jerky Animations in PowerPoint 2010 and 2013

Stop PowerPoint from Getting the Animation Jitters!

Many thanks Troy and Geetesh for the posts and Amy, Chris Mahoney and Steve Rindsberg for the work-around.

Don’t feel comfortable editing the registry yourself?  Run OfficeOne’s handy SpriteClipping utility.  It will automatically make the change if you’re using PowerPoint 2010 or PowerPoint 2013.  Make sure PowerPoint is closed before running the utility.  Thanks for making it easy for us, Chirag.

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Infographics – When Familiarity Doesn’t Breed Contempt

CaveArt Infographics are a hot topic these days, but the truth is infographics have been around for more than 30,000 years. From the first moment a person drew a picture with a stick in the dirt we’ve been using infographics.  Infographics are simply images used to tell a story.  Those images can be anything from drawings, symbols, photos, charts and even letters of a language.  They are all a means to visually communicate.

The key to effective infographics is familiarity to your audience.  Consider the petroglyphs found in caves.  Some images are easily interpreted, such as the story of a hunt showing stick figures with spears and images of animals.  Other images, like spirals and the outlines of hands, are less clear.  We can guess what the artist meant, but we can’t really know for sure. Additionally many of these images are drawn very close together or right on top of one another, increasing the difficulty in understanding the message.

The same concept applies to written languages, we must understand the symbol (or letter) and how each symbol is grouped with other symbols to understand the message.  Many of the ancient languages did not use spacing which makes it additionally challenging for experts to translate.

When used effectively, infographics are a very powerful medium for telling your story.  The right infographic can  transcend language barriers allowing your message to be universally understood by all who view it.  For happyexample, the image of a happy face is easily recognized globally across all races, cultures, genders and even ages.  The smallest child will recognize a happy face even when it’s nothing more than a circle with two dots for eyes and a curved line for the smile.

Familiarity is one of the Gestalt Principles of Perception and, unfortunately, one of the weakest principles.  As I’ve illustrated in my narrative, even if the audience is completely familiar with the images and symbols used, the message can become muddied when the principle of proximity is not used correctly.  By effectively applying the principles of perception to your infographics you can achieve pragnanz, the perfect clarity of your message.  If you aren’t familiar with the Gestalt Principles of Perception, I invite you to view my tutorial, The Gestalt of Slides.

I’ve recently written a series of articles for creating infographics using PowerPoint 2013.  Although these articles are specific to techniques in PowerPoint, the methodology is also applicable to other tools.

PowerPoint 2013 Visualizations: Infographics

These articles also introduce you to the Hierarchy of Knowledge and explain how using infographics can transform your data to wisdom.

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Happy New Year 2013

After a dismal 2012 where I had no time to contribute to this site, my new resolution is to ensure 2013 will be a great year and I hope to share many wonderful and interesting concepts, ideas, etc. this year.

To kick 2013 off, here’s a fun presentation to celebrate the new year.  Although you can click through the slides below, the show will run automatically if you view it in slideshow mode.

Cheers!

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A Little Steampunk for the Holidays

http://steampunkrevue.blogspot.com/2011/12/macys-steampunk-christmas-window.html

Macy’s isn’t the only one who can spread a little steampunk holiday cheer.  After becoming a fan of Gail Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate series, I knew I wanted to create a steampunk themed template for PowerPoint 2010. The opportunity (and challenge) of animating a bunch of Victorian-era whirly gigs was just too much to resist. And if Macy’s can share a steampunk theme for the holiday, so can I.

I’ve created a sample presentation using the template (shown below.)  Click on the image and then choose the menu option to Open in PowerPoint since the web apps cannot support video. You can download the template to use for yourself and create your own steampunk themed presentations. After the slide show opens, click File, Download a Copy.

Have a hankering to create your own steampunk animation to share for the holidays?  Download the template, add your layout and send me a link to the file. I’ll add it to the template and credit you on the layout.

SteamPunk

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The Presentation Thespian

PowerPointNascar

I have a jacket that showcases badges and pins recognizing my expertise in PowerPoint. I always wear my “PowerPoint Nascar” jacket when attending events even if I don’t wear it when presenting. This jacket, combined with my techie clothes and trademark long ponytail, creates a brand that immediately identifies me as a PowerPoint technical expert.

Multiple studies have found that speakers who are perceived as credible, attractive and trustworthy are much more effective at persuading an audience and having them retain their message.

This provides presenters with an easy opportunity to capitalize on these findings.  By simply recognizing the theatrics of presentations and dressing the part, presenters can gain instant initial credibility.

I taken this idea and made a fully interactive tutorial. Through this tutorial you’ll learn how to use theatrical concepts to increase your appearance as a credible and trustworthy presenter. Click the icon in the lower right of the tutorial below to run it in full screen mode. Once the presentation starts, I recommend you click the SkyDrive link to Start Slide Show or you can start it directly from this link: The Theatrics of Presentations.

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The PowerPoint Magic Trick & How the Brain Works

crystalballA few months ago I posted a blog article about why presenters should care about the psychology of the senses.  In that article I explained why mouse-overs can be used to fool an audience into thinking they’re seeing one slide when they’re really seeing two slides with a small difference.  I also posted a PowerPoint presentation which demonstrated the mouse-over technique.  Included in that presentation was the PowerPoint card trick which I said I would explain later.  I didn’t want to explain the trick until after I had posted the Gestalt of Slides because that tutorial covers a lot of the reasons why the card trick works.

If you haven’t seen the card trick, I’ve recreated it below.  Click the icon in the lower right of the presentation to run it in full screen mode. Or you can start it directly from this link: The PowerPoint Card Trick.  Don’t read below the embedded presentation until after you’ve watched the trick or you’ll spoil it for yourself.

Pretty amazing, yes?  Of course the trick doesn’t work for everyone, but it will fool most of us because of the way our brains are wired to process visual information.  A magician would tell you the trick works because of misdirection.  Typically, that means someone would be distracting your focus of attention so they could do something else, but that’s not really the case in the PowerPoint Card Trick.  I can instruct you to focus on a single card, but that’s the extent of the misdirection.

In this case the trick works mostly because of the Gestalt Principles of Perception.  If you went through my Gestalt of Slides tutorial you learned that we view our world holistically and our brains are predisposed to perceive patterns.  Once our brains perceive a pattern we tend to not pay attention to the details.  So in the case of the cards we perceive the red/black/red/black pattern and fail to pay attention to the rest of the details of the cards (except the one we focus on.)  This makes it appear as if I used PowerPoint to make your card disappear when, in fact, all the cards changed.

Interestingly enough, scientists are now realizing that magicians have a lot to offer in helping us figure our how our brains work.  I recently watched a NOVA special and to paraphrase one of the neuropsychologists, “We know how the brain processes visual information, but we don’t know what it pays attention to.”  In the special they use magicians to help them determine just that.  As a presenter this is very valuable information for you to know.  Imagine how much more effective you can be if, like a magician, you can direct (or distract) your audience’s attention to be exactly where you want it.

The biggest revelation of the study was how very much we pay attention to movement.  Basically if it moves, our eyes are going to follow it.  So if you have an item that you particularly want your audience to focus on then move it, move it, move it.  With PowerPoint animations this is so easily accomplished there’s no reason not to take advantage of it.  Even if you choose not to use the animations, simply moving the cursor, a pointer or even your arm can have the same effect.  Even moving your eyes will work because studies have shown we will automatically turn and look to see what the other person is looking at.  We track the movement of each other’s eyes.

Why do we do this?  It’s not too hard to imagine how helpful these traits were to primitive humans when they needed to see a predator in the bush and even today to avoid that oncoming car.

A word of caution, as far as our senses are concerned everything has a very fast extinction rate.  This means we’ll quickly quit paying attention to something that repeats.  Generally speaking, as far as our brains are concerned, if something is repetitive it’s probably not a danger and therefore not worth paying attention to.  So if you use too much movement, you’ll quickly lose your audience.

This is just one small thing covered by the special I watched so I happily post the link for your own viewing.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

NOVA – How Does the Brain Work?

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